Unit 4: Lessons 92 – 100

Lesson92picaLesson 92: In this lesson, you will learn about the Korean grammatical principle of ~도록, which has confused foreign learners of Korean for ages. There are three common meanings of ~도록, but I will break it all down for you step by step, so you have no reason to worry.
Lesson93pic2Lesson 93: In this lesson, you will learn how to add ~지 or its formal equivalent ~죠 to the end of a sentence. The meaning that this grammatical form has is usually tricky for foreign learners of Korean to pick up on – but don’t worry, I am here to explain everything to you
Lesson94picLesson 94: In this lesson, you will learn about adding ~게 되다 to verbs or adjectives. In Lesson 14 you learned about 되다 and how it is used in passive sentences. Using 되다 in the ~게 되다 has a different meaning that needs to be discussed in this lesson.
Lesson95picLesson 95: In this lesson, you will learn how to use 뿐 in a variety of situations. First, you will learn how to use 뿐 after a noun. Then, you will learn how to use 뿐 after a verb/adjective – both at the end of a sentence and in the middle of a sentence. Finally, you will learn how to use ~뿐만 아니라 to have the meaning of “not only A, but B.”
Lesson96picLesson 96: In this lesson, you will learn how to connect two clauses with ~(으)려면 to have the meaning of “if one wants to be able to” or “if one intends to.”
Lesson97picLesson 97: In this lesson, you will learn about the word 갖다, which is actually a colloquial abbreviation of the word “가지다.” The Korean language has evolved in such a way that “갖다” can now be thought of as a word, but due to the fact that it is actually an abbreviation, it has atypical grammatical rules. I will break these rules open for you.
Lesson98picLesson 98: In this lesson, you will learn about a grammatical principles that is essentially an extension of the ~는 것 principle that you studied at great lengths in the first five lessons of Unit 2. 척(하다) can be used instead of “것” in the “~는 것” principle to mean “to pretend.”
Lesson99picLesson 99: In this lesson, you will learn how to use the ~더라도 as a connector between two clauses to mean “even if.” Though this form sometimes may look similar to “Even though” (~지만) or “If” (~ㄴ/는다면), I will distinguish them for you in this lesson.
Lesson100Lesson 100: Our 100th lesson! In this lesson, you will learn about the grammatical principle ~ㄹ/을 텐데(요), and to a lesser extend ~ㄹ/을 테니까.
Lessons 92-100minitestpicLessons 92 – 100 Mini Test: Test yourself on what you learned from Lessons 92 to 100!

Click here to jump to Lessons 101 – 108 in Unit 5. Or, check out all of Unit 5.