Lesson 41: To Give: 주다, ~아/어 주다

Click here for a Workbook to go along with this lesson.

Jump to:

Vocabulary
Introduction

주다 = to give
Verb stem + ~아/어 주다
Using 주다 with Negative Imperative Sentences
Thank You For…

 

Vocabulary

Click on the English word to see information and examples of that word in use. You might not be able to understand all of the grammar within the example sentences, but most of the grammar used will be introduced by the end of Unit 2. Use these sentences to give yourself a feel for how each word can be used, and maybe even to expose yourself to the grammar that you will be learning shortly.

A PDF file neatly presenting these words and extra information can be found here.

Nouns:
동료 = colleague, peer

The pronunciation of this word is closer to “동뇨”

Common Usages:
동료애 = feelings you have towards your peers (“a camaraderie”)
회사동료 = colleague at work
직장동료 = colleague at work

Examples:
동료가 그 일을 저에게 설명해 줬어요 = A colleague explained that work to me

그 회사원이 승진을 해서 동료들한테 인기를 얻었어요
= That worker’s popularity increased amongst his coworkers because he got promoted

저는 오늘 직장동료들과 회식이 있어서 집에 늦게 들어갔어요
= I went home late today because I had a staff dinner with colleagues from work

사거리 = intersection

Notes: 사거리 is an intersection where four roads meet at one point (two perpendicular roads). The word “삼거리” is also possible, which describes an intersection where three roads meet at one point.

Common Usages:
It is common to place a neighborhood name before “사거리” to describe the big intersection that defines a neighborhood in Korea.

Examples:
우리는 사거리에서 왼쪽으로 돌았어요 = We turned left at the intersection
이 사거리를 지나면 고속도로가 시작돼요 = If you go past this intersection, the highway starts
전철역 앞 사거리에 있는 스타벅스에 항상 사람이 많아요 = There is always a lot of people in the Starbucks in-front of the subway station

어린이집 = day care

Notes: When children in Korea turn four years old, they usually attend an “어린이집” for one to three years. Sometime before they turn eight years old, they will start to attend a “유치원.” When they turn eight years old, they start attending elementary school. At an 어린이집, they will do some educational activities, but it is more of a day care center. A 유치원 is more focused on education.

Common Usages:
어린이집을 다니다 = to attend a day care
어린이집을 보내다 = to send somebody to a day care
어린이집 선생님 = a person (or teacher) who works at a day care

Examples:
선생님은 밤에 우리를 위해 어린이집을 잠깐 열어 줬어요
= The teacher opened the daycare for us at night for a little bit (for us/me)

보통 유치원에 가기 전에 아이들은 어린이집에 가요
= Usually kids go to day care before they go to kindergarten

점점 더 일하는 여성들이 많아지면서 어린이집 수요는 늘고 있어요
= Gradually as there are more females who are working, the demand for day cares is increasing

유치원 = kindergarten

Notes: When children in Korea turn four years old, they usually attend an “어린이집” for one to three years. Sometime before they turn eight years old, they will start to attend a “유치원.” When they turn eight years old, they start attending elementary school. At an 어린이집, they will do some educational activities, but it is more of a care center. A 유치원 is more focused on education.
In Canada, kindergarten is usually connected with elementary schools. In Korea, kindergartens are usually businesses with no affiliation to an elementary school.

Common Usages:
유치원생 = a kindergarten student
유치원 선생님 = kindergarten teacher
유치원 반 = a kindergarten class (a group of kids)
유치원을/에 다니다 = to attend a day care

Examples:
우리 아이를 이 유치원에 받아 주세요 = Please accept our child into this kindergarten
저는 5살부터 유치원을 다니기 시작했어요 = I started attending kindergarten from 5 years of age
아이들은 유치원에서 사회에서 필요한 사회능력을 배우기 시작해요 = Kids start learning social skills that they need in society in kindergarten

뿌리 = roots

Notes: Just like in English “뿌리” can refer to the roots of a plant, or also one’s background

Common Usages:
나무뿌리 = root of a tree
뿌리염색 = dying the roots of one’s hair

Examples:
자기의 뿌리를 잊지 말아 주세요 = Please don’t forget your roots

나무뿌리가 썩지 않게 물을 너무 많이 주면 안돼요
= You shouldn’t give too much water so that the root of the tree doesn’t rot

염색을 밝은 색으로 하면 주기적으로 뿌리염색을 해야 해서 귀찮아요
= It is annoying when you dye your hair a bright color because you need to dye your roots periodically

무역 = trade

Common Usages:
해외무역 = international trade
무역센터 = trade center
무역협정을 맺다 = to enter into a trade agreement
무역회사 = trade company

Examples:
해외무역건물이 어디 있는지 보여주세요 = Please show me where the international trade building is
무역회사에서 일하고 싶으면 기본적으로 영어를 할 줄 알아야 해요 = If you want to work at a trade company, you need to know how to speak basic English

= chin

Common Usages:
턱받이 = bib
턱걸이 = chin-up
주걱턱 = a big chin
턱이 길다 = to have a long chin

Examples:
남자가 생각하면서 턱을 긁었어요 = The man scratched his chin while he thought
너무 딱딱한 음식을 많이 먹으면 턱에 무리가 가서 좋지 않아요 = If you eat a lot of hard food, it puts too much stress on your chin so it is not good

왼발 = left foot

Examples:
이번에는 우리가 공을 왼발로 차 볼 거예요 = This time, we will try to kick the ball with our left feet
몇몇 사람들은 왼발이 오른발보다 크기가 커요 = Some people’s left foot is larger than their right foot

왼손 = left hand

Common Usages:
왼손잡이 = a left handed person

Examples:
왼손만 주세요 = Give me only your left hand
대부분 사람들은 왼손으로 글을 못 써요 = Most people can’t write with their left hand

왼손잡이이면 가끔 일상생활을 할 때 불편할 때가 있어요
= If you are left handed, sometimes things in daily life are uncomfortable

왼손 오른손 골고루 사용하는 것이 뇌 발달에 좋아요
= It is good for the development of one’s brain to use both your right and left hand

오른발 = right foot

Examples:
이 양말을 오른발에 신겨 주세요 = Please put this sock on my right foot

저는 특히 오른발이 왼발보다 커서 신발을 살 때 불편해요
= My right foot is particularly larger than my left foot, so it is hard for me to buy shoes

오른손 = right hand

Common Usages:
오른손잡이 = a right handed person

Examples:
저는 오른손 잡이여서 오른손을 훨씬 더 많이 사용해요
= I’m right-handed, so I use my right hand much more

정답을 모르는 사람은 오른손을 올려 주세요
= The people who don’t know the answer, please raise your right hand

왼손 오른손 골고루 사용하는 것이 뇌 발달에 좋아요
= It is good for the development of one’s brain to use both your right and left hand

손바닥 = palm

The pronunciation of this word is closer to “손빠닥”

Examples:
엄마가 나의 볼을 손바닥으로 때렸어요 = My mom slapped me on my cheek with the palm of her hand
엄마가 과자를 내 손바닥에 놓아 주었어 = Mom put some candy into my hands (on my palms) for me

손바닥에 있는 손금에 따라 미래를 예측하는 사람이 있어요
= There are people who can predict your future based on the lines on your palm

박수를 많이 치면 손바닥에 자극을 줘서 건강에 좋아요
= Clapping a lot gives your palms stimulation so it is good for one’s health

음성 = voice

Notes: The word “목소리” typically refers to one’s actual voice, as in the sound that comes out of one’s mouth. “음성” is typically placed before a noun to indicate that the noun is related to “voices.” For example, a voice recognition system in Korea would be called “음성인식시스템” but probably not a “목소리인식시스템”

Common Usages:
음성메시지 = voice message
음성녹음 = voice recording

Examples:
음성 메시지를 남겨 주세요 = Please leave me a voice message

요즘에 거의 모든 핸드폰에 음성 녹음 기능이 있어요
= These days almost all cell phones have a voice recording system

핸드폰에 전화를 해서 상대방이 전화를 받지 않으면 음성 메시지로 넘어가요
= If you call somebody and they don’t answer, it goes to voice message

이마 = forehead

Common Usages:
이마가 넓다 = to have a big (wide) forehead
이마가 좁다 = to have a small (narrow) forehead

Examples:
이마가 좀 아파요 = My forehead is a little bit sore
이것을 이마에 붙여 주세요 = Please stick this on my forehead
저는 이마가 넓어서 꼭 앞머리가 있어야 해요 = I have a big forehead, so I need to have bangs
이마의 모양에 따라 사람마다 어울리는 헤어스타일이 달라요 = Depending on the shape of one’s forehead, the hairstyle that suits a person is different

발가락 = toe

The pronunciation of this word is closer to “발까락”

Examples:
제가 빨리 걸어서 발가락을 부딪혔어요 = Because I was walking fast I stubbed my toe
사람마다 제일 긴 발가락이 달라요 = The longest toe is different for everybody

발목 = ankle

Common Usages:
발목을 찌다 = to sprain one’s ankle
발목이 얇다 = to have thin ankles

Examples:
발목이 아파서 잠깐 봐 주세요 = My ankle is sore, so please look at it for a second

발목이 얇을수록 신발을 살 때 선택의 폭이 넓어져요
= The thinner your ankles are, the more types of shoes you can choose from

운동을 하다 발목을 다치는 사람이 많기 때문에 꼭 조심해야 해요
= You need to be careful because there are many people who hurt their ankles while exercising

엉덩이 = butt

Examples:
제 엉덩이를 만지지 말아 주세요 = Please don’t touch my bum
장거리 운전을 하면 엉덩이가 아파요 = When/if you drive long distances, your bum will be sore
요즘에는 예쁜 엉덩이 라인을 만들기 위해 스쿼트 운동이 유행하고 있어요 = These days, in order to make a good butt-line, doing squats is getting popular

신체 = body

Common Usages:
신체비율 = body ratio
건강한 신체 건강한 정신 = strong body strong mind
신체검사 = body check up

Examples:
각 나라마다 사람들의 평균 신체비율이 달라요 = Each country has a different average body ratio
한국에서는 남자들이 군대에 가기 전에 꼭 신체검사를 받아야 해요 = In Korea, before men go to the army, they need to get a body check up

감옥 = prison

Notes: Korean prisons serve rice with beans a lot so people often say “콩밥을 먹다” to indicate that a person is in prison.

Common Usages:
감옥살이 = prison life

Examples:
저를 감옥에 넣지 말아 주세요! = Please don’t put me in prison!

살인자 박씨는 재판 후에 50년형을 선고 받고 감옥에 갔어요
= The murderer, Mr. Park stood in-front of the judge, received his 50 year sentence and went to jail

보통 범죄자들이 감옥살이를 한 후 퇴소하면 일반 사회에 적응 하기 힘들어요
= Usually, when prisoners leave a prison after they have lived the prison lifestyle, it is difficult for them to adjust to everyday society

= cheek

Examples:
볼에 이 로션을 발라 주세요 = Please put this lotion on my cheeks
엄마가 나의 볼를 손바닥으로 때렸어요 = My mom slapped me on my cheek with the palm of her hand

슬기의 볼이 통통하고 귀여워서 매일 뽀뽀해주고 싶어요
= Seulgi’s cheeks are very chubby and cute, so I want kiss them everyday

프랑스에서는 인사를 할 때 상대방의 볼에 얼굴을 대고 인사해요
= In France when you greet a person, you put your face to the other person’s cheek

제자리 = in the right place

Common Usages:
제자리걸음 = to be walking but standing still (also refers to something that “isn’t going anywhere”)

Examples:
책을 읽은 후에 제자리에 둬야 해요  = After reading the book, you have to put it back in the right place
저의 영어 실력은 아무리 열심히 해도 제자리걸음이라 너무 실망스러워요
= It doesn’t matter how hard I try, my English skills aren’t going anywhere (aren’t developing) so I’m disappointed

Verbs:
상대하다 = to deal with people

Common Usages:
상대방 = the other party/person/adversary
상대방을 앞지르다 = to pass/go ahead of an opponent

Examples:
경찰관은 밖에 있는 미친 사람과 상대해 줬어요
= The policeman dealt with the crazy person outside (for me)

제가 외국 사람이라서 이 회사에서 저를 상대해 주고 싶은 사람이 없어요
= Nobody wants to deal with me at this company because I’m a foreigner

서비스직은 사람들을 상대해야 하기 때문에 생각보다 힘들어요
= In service jobs, you have to deal with people so it is more difficult than people think

미치다 = to go crazy

Common Usages:
미쳤어?! = Are you crazy?!

Examples:
저는 피자를 너무 좋아해서 피자만 보면 미쳐요 = I like pizza so much that even when I see pizza I go crazy
좋은 성적을 받기 위해 저는 일년 동안 공부에 미쳤었어요 = I studied like crazy for a year to get a good grade

Adverbs and Other Words:
멀리 = far, far away

This is the adverb form of the adjective 멀다.

Notes: Particles aren’t usually added to adverbs. However, ~에서 is often added to 멀리 to express that something comes from (or is done) “far away.” 멀리에서 is sometimes shortened to “멀리서”.”

할머니가 오늘 멀리에서 오셨어요 = Grandma came from far away (for me/us) today
멀리서 그가 수업이 끝나고 걸어 오는 것이 보였다 = I saw him from far away finish class and come walking

Examples:
직장에서 더 멀리 이사하게 되었어요 = I ended up moving farther away from work
저는 멀리 살고 있기 때문에 집까지 걸어가기 힘들어요 = It is difficult to walk home because I live far
서울에서 멀리 살수록 집값이 더 저렴해져요 = The farther you live from Seoul, the more affordable housing prices are

너무나 = extremely

Examples:
그를 너무나 사랑했지만 언어장벽으로 인해 떠나야 했어요
= I loved him a lot, but I had to leave him due to a language barrier

이 일이 너무나 불공평한 걸 알았지만 그냥 받아들이기로 했어요
= I knew this job was very unfair, but I just decided to accept it

최초 = the first time in history something is done or occurs

Examples:
저의 와이프가 그 식품을 한국에 최초로 수입했어요
= My wife was the first person to import that (food) product to Korea

달에 최초로 착륙하는 사람은 Neil Armstrong이었어요
= The first person to land on the moon was Neil Armstrong

최초로 하늘을 나는 비행기구를 만든 사람들은 라이트형제예요
= The first people that made an airplane that flies in the sky were the Wright Brothers

= beginning of a time period

Notes: 초 is placed after an indication of time to indicate that something occurs at the “beginning” of the indicated time period.

Common Usages:
1월 초 = at the beginning of January
2월 초 = at the beginning of February
학기 초 = at the beginning of a semester

Examples:
내년 초에 오빠가 돈을 보내 줄 거예요 = My brother will send the money early next year
이달 초에 친구들과 모임이 많을 거여서 매우 바쁠 것 같아요 = I will probably be very busy at the beginning of this month because I have a lot of meetings with friends

= end of a time period

Notes: 말 is placed after an indication of time to indicate that something occurs at the “end” of the indicated time period.

Common Usages:
1월 말 = at the end of January
2월 말 = at the end of February
학기 말 = at the end of a semester
기말고사 = final exam

Examples: 6월 말에 돈을 주세요 = Give me the money at the end of June
매년 말에 한 해를 마무리하는 행사가 많아요 = There are a lot of events that close out the year at the end of every year

결코 = put with negative sentences to stress

Examples:
저는 결코 그 사람을 한 번도 사랑한 적이 없어요
= I have really never loved that person (not even once)

사람들이 제가 거짓말을 했다고 생각하지만 저는 결코 거짓말을 하지 않았어요
= Many people think that I lied, but I (really) never lied

For help memorizing these words, try using our Memrise tool.

 

Introduction

In the previous lesson, you learned how to give commands using the imperative voice. In this lesson, you will learn how to use 주다 and how it can be used with the imperative voice. In addition, you will learn how to use ~아/어 주다 when an action is done for you. Let’s get started.

.

 

주다 = to give

주다 means “to give” and you already know how to use it in a wide variety of sentences when an object is being given. For example:

저는 저의 친구에게 돈을 줬어요 = I gave my friend money
아빠는 나에게 음식을 줬어 = Dad gave me food

When asking/telling/commanding another person to give something to you, you can attach an imperative ending that you learned in the previous lesson. For example, if you want somebody to give you a book, you can attach any imperative form:

그 책을 (나에게) 줘 = Give me that book
그 책을 (나에게) 줘라 = Give me that book (usually pronounced as 주라)
그 책을 (저에게) 주세요 = Give me that book

Other examples:
맥주 한 병을 주세요 = Give me one bottle of beer (please)
저 숟가락을 주세요 = Give me that spoon (please)
밥을 많이 주세요 = Give me lots of rice
왼손만 주세요 = Give me only your left hand
6월 말에 돈을 주세요 = Give me the money at the end of June

The sentences above only involve objects being given. It is also possible to use 주다 when an action is being done for a person. Let’s talk about this next.

 

 

Verb stem + ~/주다

By adding ~아/어 주다 to the stem of a word, you can imply that the action is somehow beneficial to you (or whoever the action is being done for); almost as if it were a favor that another person completed. In these cases, not only is the action completed, but it is completed for you (or whoever). For example:

그 선생님은 한국어를 저에게 가르쳤어요 = That teacher taught me Korean
그 선생님은 한국어를 저에게 가르쳐 줬어요 = That teacher taught me Korean

Those sentences essentially have the same meaning, but by adding “~아/어 주다” the speaker is emphasizing that the teacher provided some sort of service/favor by teaching you.

Many more examples:

Notice that ~(으)시 can be added to ~아/어 주다 if the person acting deserves high respect.

엄마가 과자를 내 손바닥에 놓아 주었어
= Mom put some candy into my hands (on my palms) for me

내년 초에 오빠가 돈을 보내 줄 거예요
= My brother will send the money early next year

동료가 그 일을 저에게 설명해 줬어요
= A colleague explained that work to me

할머니가 오늘 멀리에서 와 주셨어요
= Grandma came from far away (for me/us) today

경찰관은 밖에 있는 미친 사람과 상대해 줬어요
= The policeman dealt with the crazy person outside (for me)

제가 외국 사람이라서 이 회사에서 저를 상대해 주고 싶은 사람이 없어요
= Nobody wants to deal with me at this company because I’m a foreigner

선생님은 밤에 우리를 위해 어린이집을 잠깐 열어 줬어요
= The teacher opened the daycare for us at night for a little bit (for us/me)

You learned in the previous lesson how to add imperative endings to words. If you want a person to do something for you, you can first add ~아/어 주다 to the stem of the word and add an imperative ending to 주다.

Notice the difference between the following sentences:

빨리 오세요 = Come quick
빨리 와 주세요 = Come quick (for me)

Notice that both sentences essentially have the same meaning. The first sentence is simply a command, but the second sentence (because of the nature of the word “주다”) implies that the desired action is beneficial to the speaker. Almost as if the action is a favor that the speaker would like to happen.

Therefore, adding ~아/어 주다 to a stem gives the sentence the meaning of “do __ for me.” This often translates more simply to “Please, …..” For example:

점심을 요리해 주세요! = Please, make me lunch
이것을 만들어 주세요 = Please, make this for me

The two sentences above have essentially the same meaning, but a slightly different feel than the following sentences:

점심을 요리하세요 = Make lunch
이것을 만드세요 = Make this

The only difference being that when using ‘주다’ you are specifically asking for some sort of ‘service.’ When you do not include ‘주다,’ you are just telling somebody to do something. However, by saying 주다, you are indicating that the person is doing something for you.

Many more examples:

그 책을 제자리에 둬 주세요 = Please put that book back in its place
볼에 이 로션을 발라 주세요 = Please put this lotion on my cheeks
이것을 이마에 붙여 주세요 = Please stick this on my forehead
음성 메시지를 남겨 주세요 = Please leave me a voice message
우리 아이를 이 유치원에 받아 주세요 = Please accept our child into this kindergarten
발목이 아파서 잠깐 봐 주세요 = My ankle is sore, so please look at it for a second
이 양말을 오른발에 신겨 주세요 = Please put this sock on my right foot
정답을 모르는 사람은 오른손을 올려 주세요 = The people who don’t know the answer, please raise your right hand

In Lesson 36 you learned about the word 보이다 and how it can be used to indicate that one cannot see something. ~아/어 주다 is often added to 보이다 to ask for something to “be shown” to somebody. 보여주다 and 보여 주다 (with and without the space) are acceptable. For example:

얼굴을 보여주세요 = Please show (me) your face
발가락을 보여 주세요 = Please show me your toe
해외무역건물이 어디 있는지 보여주세요 = Please show me where the international trade building is

————————–

좀 is an interesting word that is commonly used in Korean – especially in speech. One way that it is used is as a shortened version of “조금.” As such, it can replace “조금” in sentences where appropriate, but this is usually reserved for speaking or dialogue in print. For example:

날씨가 좀 추워졌어요 = The weather got a little bit cold
저는 좀 더 올라갈 거예요 = I’m going to go a little bit higher
이마가 좀 아파요 = My forehead is a little bit sore
제가 산 주식은 좀 비쌌어요 = The stocks I bought were a bit expensive

It is also common to find “좀” used in imperative sentences. When asking somebody to do something for you, using “좀” makes the request sound a little bit softer. This is almost impossible to translate to English, as its addition simply adds a feel to the sentence. For example:

밥을 좀 많이 주세요 = Give me lots of rice
이것을 좀 만들어 주세요 = Please, make this for me
그 책을 제자리에 좀 둬 주세요 = Please put that book back in its place (for me)

There are other ways to ask for something in Korean that don’t need the imperative mood. For example, you could also say “Can you do this for me?” It would also be appropriate to use “좀” in sentences like this as well. This grammar has not been introduced yet, so I do not want to talk about it here. It will be talked about in Lesson 45.

————————–

 

 

 

Using 주다 with Negative Imperative Sentences

Just like you learned in the previous lesson, you can tell a person not to do something by adding ~지 말다 to the stem of a word. You can also add ~아/어 주다 after ~지 말다 to have the same effect as described previously. That is, you are asking for somebody to not do something for you. For example:

그것을 말하지 마세요 = Don’t say that
그것을 말하지 말아 주세요 = Please don’t say that

Those sentences essentially have the same meaning, but by adding “주다” the speaker is emphasizing that the teacher provided some sort of service/favor by not “saying that.” Below are many more examples:

수업 시간 동안 자지 말아 주세요 = Please don’t sleep in class
저를 쳐다보지 말아 주세요 = Please don’t stare at me
제 엉덩이를 만지지 말아 주세요 = Please don’t touch my bum
저를 감옥에 넣지 말아 주세요! = Please don’t put me in prison!
자기의 뿌리를 잊지 말아 주세요 = Please don’t forget your roots

 

 

Thank You For…

This is where everything starts to come together. You can use the concepts you learned in this lesson, the previous lesson, and in Lesson 37 to say “thank you for….”

If you wanted to say, “thank you for listening,” you would have to use multiple concepts.

First off, a word: 들어보다 (to listen)

By adding ~아/어 주다 to 들어보다, we get: 들어봐 주다, which can be used many ways:

그는 제 말을 들어봐 줬어요 = He listened to me
제 말을 들어봐 주세요 = Listen to me, please

If you add ~아/어서 (because) to 들어봐 주다, you get:

들어봐 줘서…

which means something like “because you listene(d).”

If you add “감사하다” (thank you) after ~아/어서, you get:

들어봐 줘서 감사합니다 = Because you listened, thank you (thank you for listening)

Okay, one more time.

1) Take a verb: 요리하다 (to cook)
2) Add ~아/어 주다: 요리해 주다
3) Add ~아/어서: 요리해 줘서
4) Add 감사하다 = 요리해 줘서 감사합니다 = thanks for cooking

It seems really confusing because there are so many concepts wrapped in one sentence. More examples will help you get the hang of it:

열심히 공부해 줘서 감사합니다 = Thanks for studying hard
이것을 가르쳐 줘서 감사합니다 = Thanks for teaching that to me
문을 열어 줘서 감사합니다 = Thanks for opening the door for me

To make it even more confusing, often times ~(으)시 is added to ~아/어 주다 (because, usually when you are thanking somebody, you are trying to be formal). For example:

이것을 가르쳐 주셔서 감사합니다 = Thanks for teaching that to me
(가르치다 + ~아/어 주다 + ~(으)시 + ~아/어서 + 감사합니다)

And that is why I waited until Lesson 41 to teach you about this concept. There would have been no way that you would have been able to grasp everything I taught in this lesson if I had taught it earlier. It took us so long to get to the point where I was comfortable teaching concepts like ~아/어서 and ‘~(으)시,’ and now we are using both of those concepts together in addition to what you learned in this lesson.

Tough stuff, but hopefully you understood everything correctly.

If you have any questions or comments, feel free to make a post on our Forum!

Now that you have reached the end of Lesson 41, why not try taking our Mini-Test where you can test yourself on what you’ve learned in the past 8 lessons.
Need a review before you do the test? Why not look back on the past 8 lessons?

Ready to move on? How about going directly to Lessons 42 – 50, or checking out Lesson 42. Or,
Click here for a Workbook to go along with this lesson.