Lesson 96: If one wants to be able to: ~(으)려면

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Vocabulary
Introduction

If one wants to be able to: ~(으)려면

 

 

Vocabulary

Nouns:
연기 = smoke
뒷맛 = aftertaste
경기장 = sports stadium
경기력 = sports performance
현관 = entrance room
층계 = stairwell
인내 = patience/endurance
인내심 = patience
정치 = politics
식탁 = dinner table
소풍 = outing/picnic/excursion
서점 = bookstore
경치 = view/scenery

Verbs:
개발하다 = to develop
저축하다 = to save money
낭비하다 = to waste
찾아오다 = to visit, to come looking for
취직하다 = to find a job
무시하다 = to ignore
다루다 = to treat, to deal with
생각해보다 = to think about it

Passive Verbs:
반대되다 = to be opposite

Adverbs and Other Words
순순히 = obediently
참 = really/very/extremely
새해 = new years

For help memorizing these words, try using our Memrise tool.

 

Introduction

This lesson will be short because you will be learning about one grammatical principle that is fairly straightforward. In this lesson, you will learn how to connect two clauses with ~(으)려면 to have the meaning of “if one wants to be able to” or “if one intends to.” Let’s get started.

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If one wants to be able to: ~()려면

In Lesson 32 you learned how to connect two clauses with ~(으)려고 to have the meaning ‘in order to,’ or ‘for the purpose of.’ For example:

저는 저의 친구를 만나려고 서울에 갔어요 = I went to Seoul in order to meet my friend

In Lesson 43 you learned how to connect two clauses with ~(으)면 to have the meaning of ‘if’ or ‘when.’ For example:

거기에 가면 알려주세요 = If you go there, let me know

This is the first time that you have been introduced to a grammatical form that is actually a combination of two grammatical forms tied together. Not only is the physical look of ~(으)려면 a combination of ~(으)려고 and ~(으)면, but its meaning is the combination of the two respective meanings.

By connecting two clauses with ~(으)려면, you can create the meaning “if one wants to be able to” or “if one intends to.” Though both translations have similar meanings, I like to use the first translation (“if one wants to be able to”) because you can plainly see how ~려 and ~면 are being used to create this meaning.

When making sentences, most of the time you can replace ~(으)려면 with ~고 싶으면. For example:

대학교에 가려면 수능을 잘 봐야 돼요 = If you want to be able to go to University, you should do well on 수능
대학교에 가고 싶으면 수능을 잘 봐야 돼요 = If you want to go to university, you should do well on 수능

의사가 되려면 공부를 많이 해야 돼요 = If you want to be able to be a doctor, you should study a lot
의사가 되고 싶으면 공부를 많이 해야 돼요 = if you want to be a doctor, you should study a lot

The subtle difference that exists between ~(으)려면 and ~고 싶으면 is that the ~려 in ‘~(으)려면’ signifies that the desired action requires a certain amount of effort to be completed. For example, where this sentence makes sense:

가고 싶으면 가세요! = If you want to go, go!

…replacing ~고 싶으면 with ~(으)려면 would not make sense. In this example, simply the act of going does not require any effort. However, in the examples presented earlier, ‘becoming a doctor,’ and ‘going to university’ require a significant amount of effort, and the upcoming clause specifies where that effort should be channeled.

As you have seen, when ~(으)려면 is used, it is usually followed by a clause ending with ~아/어야 하다. Other typical endings are ~이/가 필요하다 or an imperative ending like ~세요 or 아/어라.

More examples:

그렇게 비싼 것을 사려면 돈이 많이 필요해요 = If you want to be able to buy that, you need a lot of money
서울에 가려면 지하철을 타! = If you want to be able to go to Seoul (if you want to go to Seoul/if you intend to go to Seoul), then take the subway!
서울에 가려면 어디로 가야 돼요? = If I want to go to Seoul, which way should I go?
주소를 바꾸려면 직접 와야 돼요 = If you want to be able to change your address, you must come in person (if you intend to change your address, you should come in person)

That’s it for this lesson!

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