Lesson 55: Quoting 주다 with ~아/어 달라고

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Vocabulary
Introduction

Quoted Imperative Sentences with 주다: ~달라고
Favor: 부탁

 

Vocabulary

Click on the English word to see information and examples of that word in use. Use these sentences to give yourself a feel for how each word can be used, and maybe even to expose yourself to the grammar that you will be learning shortly.

A PDF file neatly presenting these words and extra information can be found here.

Nouns:
세대 = generation

Common Usages:
차세대 = next generation
구세대 = the older generation
신세대 = new/young generation

Examples:
보통 ‘잡수시다’라는 말은 젊은 세대보다는 부모님들 세대에서 더 많이 사용하는 표현이에요
= Usually saying “잡수시다” is used more by the parents (older) generation than the younger generation

할아버지가 이 컴퓨터를 어떻게 쓰는지를 설명해 달라고 했지만 세대 차이 때문에 아주 힘들었어요
= Grandpa asked me to explain how to use this computer to him, but it was difficult because of the generation gap

공무원 = government worker, civil servant

Notes: It is very difficult to become a 공무원 in Korea. There are many tests and interviews that you need to do in order to become one. The more you study, and the more tests you take (if you succeed) you can get higher and higher ranks (a lower number represents a higher rank). The higher rank you have, the higher (and better) positions you can get. Having a rank of 1급 is something that only very high officials (like the president) will have. A 공무원 is seen as a good job in Korea because of its stability.

Common Usages:
공무원 시험 = an exam one needs to write to become a government worker

Examples:
저는 공무원 시험을 준비했다가 포기했어요
= I prepared to write the exam to become a government worker, and/but then I gave up

어떤 공무원이 우리 집에 와서 설문조사를 답해 달라고 했어요
= Some government worker came to our house and requested that we answer a survey

창고 = warehouse

Common Usages:
창고세일 = warehouse sale

Examples:
필요가 없는 물건을 다 창고에 넣어두세요
= Put all the items you don’t need in storage

길 건너편에 있는 옷 가게가 오늘부터 창고세일을 시작했어요
= The clothing store across the street started a warehouse sale from today

부장은 사원에게 창고에 있는 자전거를 달라고 했어요
= The boss said to his employee “give me a bike from the warehouse.”

창고에 어떤 제품이 있는지 목록을 한번 확인해야 될 것 같아요
= I’ll need to check the inventory list (once) to see which items we have in the warehouse

설문조사 = survey

Common Usages:
설문조사지 = survey form/paper

Examples:
설문조사를 벌써 작성했다고 했어요 = I said that I already filled out the survey

어떤 공무원이 우리 집에 와서 설문조사를 답해 달라고 했어요
= Some government worker came to our house and requested that we answer a survey

이 설문조사를 끝내고 자료를 정리한 후에 사장님에게 보고해야 돼요
= After finishing this survey and organizing the data, you need to report it to the boss

고급 = high quality, advanced

Common Usages:
고급반 = advanced class
고급시험 = advanced test
고급승용차 = luxury car
고급스럽다 = luxurious

Examples:
고급시험을 봐 보라고 했어요 = I told him to try to write the advanced exam

다른 사람들보다 시험 점수가 높아서 고급반으로 배정되었어요
= I was placed in the advanced class because my exam score was higher than other peoples’

이 시험은 난이도에 따라 고급시험, 중급시험, 초급시험으로 나뉘어요
= This exam is divided into levels of difficulty – advanced, intermediate and beginner

주택 = a house, housing

Notes: Many people in Korea live in an apartment. My place is actually a house. When people ask about my home, in order for me to explain that it is not an apartment, I need to say that it is a “주택.”

Common Usages:
주택가 = residential area
주택단지 = housing complex

Examples:
주택에서 살면 좋은 점은 관리비가 더 싸다는 거예요
= A good thing about living in houses is that the management fees are cheaper

한국 사람들은 주택보다 아파트에서 사는 것을 선호해요
= Korean people prefer living in apartments over houses

희망자 = somebody hoping for something, somebody wanting to do something

The pronunciation of this word is closer to “히망자”

Examples:
이 일을 하고 싶은 희망자는 모두 앞으로 나와 주세요
= All the people (hopefuls) who want to do this job come forward please

이 프로젝트에 참여하고 싶은 희망자는 총 다섯 명입니다
= There are a total of five people (hopefuls) that want to take part in this project

매출 = sales

Common Usages:
매출액 = (specifically the amount of) sales (this has a very similar meaning with 매출)
매출관리 = sales/profit management

Examples:
매출이 왜 떨어졌는지 설명해 보세요 = Explain to me why the sales dropped

우리 회사가 내년에 매출이 두 배 정도 오를 거라고 모든 사람들이 예상해요
= Everybody expects the company’s sales to go up by about double next year

이 가게의 매출은 다른 가게보다 두 배 이상 많기 때문에 더 많은 세금을 내야 해요
= The sales of this store are more than twice of that of other stores, so we have to pay more taxes

성적 = school grades

Common Usages:
성적을 높이다 = increase one’s grades

Examples:
학생은 선생님에게 성적을 올려 달라고 했어요
= The student said to the teacher “raise my grades”

그 반의 성적과 이 반의 성적에 차이가 엄청 많이 나요
= There is a big difference between the grades of that class and this class

성적이 낮았으므로 그 학생은 좋은 대학교에 못 갔어요
= That student couldn’t go to a good university because his/her grades were low

나쁜 성적 때문에 선생님은 그 학생을 여행에서 제외했어요
= The teacher excluded the student from the trip because of his bad grades

한국 고등학생의 성적을 표준화하는 것은 학생들의 입학에 도움이 된다
= The standardization of student grades in Korean high schools will help the students enter University

사원 = member of staff, employee

Notes: If I asked 100 people in Canada what their job is, I would probably only get the answer “office worker” a few times. In Korea however, probably 50% of the people would respond with “office worker.” Many Korean people work for big companies in offices, not all doing the same thing obviously, but I’m not exactly sure what they’re all doing in there. Korea has no real natural resources, so the major industry is just “working and business.” In Korean, they would refer to this position as “회사원” or “사원.”

Common Usages:
회사원 = a regular company worker
신입사원 = new employee

Examples:
저는 신입사원에게 그 일을 부탁했어요
= I asked the new employee to take care of that work (for me)

부장은 사원에게 창고에 있는 자전거를 달라고 했어요
= The boss said to his employee “give me a bike from the warehouse.”

신입사원 = new employee

Common Usages:
신입사원을 뽑다 = select/chose/hire new employees

Examples:
신입사원을 만나러 나가 = Go out to meet the new employee

저는 신입사원에게 그 일을 부탁했어요
= I asked the new employee to take care of that work (for me)

신입사원으로 입사해서 힘들었지만 잘 버텨서 어제 승진했어요
= I entered the company as a new worker (rookie) so it was very difficult, but I endured it well and was promoted yesterday

= counter for movies and TV shows

Common Usages:
속편 = a sequel
전편 = the original movie

Examples:
우리가 오늘 영화를 네 편 봤어요 = We saw four movies today

해리포터 시리즈는 총 일곱 편으로 제작되었어요
= The Harry Potter series was produced into a total of seven movies

부탁 = favor

부탁 often translates to “favor” and can be used as a noun in sentences. For example:
저는 부탁이 하나 있어요 = I have one favor

Another common translation for 부탁 is “a request.” For example:
저는 부탁이 하나 있어요 = I have one request

You can also ask for something to be done using 부탁. For example:
저는 더 자세한 설명을 부탁했어요 = I asked for a clearer explanation.
남편에게 청소를 부탁했어요 = I asked my husband to take care of the cleaning (for me)
저는 신입사원에게 그 일을 부탁했어요 = I asked the new employee to take care of that work

If the favor is an action, you can attach ~아/어 달라고 to the verb. For example:
밥을 빨리 만들어 달라고 부탁했어요 = I asked him to make (the rice) quickly
저는 그에게 더 자세히 설명해 달라고 부탁했어요 = I asked him to explain it more clearly

“부탁하다” is often said as “부탁(을) 드리다.” For example:
밥을 빨리 만들어 달라고 부탁 드렸어요 = I asked him to make (the rice) quickly
엄마에게 그것을 사 달라고 부탁 드렸어요 = I asked my mother to buy that for me

= string, wire, lace

Common Usages:
신발끈 = shoelace
머리끈 = hairband

Examples:
신발끈을 묶거나 신발을 벗으세요 = Tie your shoes or take them off
신발끈을 매다가 지갑이 주머니에서 떨어졌어요 = While I was tying me shoelaces, my wallet fell out of my pocket

Verbs:
내버려두다 = to leave alone

Common Usages:
그대로 내버려두다 = to leave something as it is

Examples:
저를 내버려둬 주세요 = Please leave me alone
저를 내버려두지 않으면 저는 화가 날 거예요 = If you don’t leave me alone I will get mad
가끔씩 제 남편이 저를 내버려두었으면 좋겠어요 = Sometimes I wish that my husband would leave me alone

꼬다 = to twist

Common Usages:
다리를 꼬다 = to cross one’s legs
머리를 꼬다 = to twist/coil one’s hair

Examples:
저의 머리카락을 꼬지 말아 달라고 했어요 = I told her to please stop twisting my hair

다리를 꼬면 골반 뼈가 어긋나기 때문에 꼬면 안돼요
= If you cross your legs, your hip (pelvic joint with your leg) can be dislocated so you shouldn’t do it

어렸을 때 저희 습관은 무의식적으로 머리를 꼬는 거였어요
= When I was young, my habit was unconsciously twisting my hair

가르다 = to divide and pass through

Common Usages:
편을 가르다 = to make teams (when playing a game)

Examples:
여자가 빗으로 가르마를 갈랐어요 = The girl divided her part (in her hair) with a comb

제 남자 친구가 물을 가르며 수영을 할 때 제일 멋있어 보여요
= When my boyfriend goes through the water as he swims he looks the most cool

게임을 할 때 잘하는 사람이 골고루 나뉘게 편을 가르는 게 중요해요
= When you play a game, it is important to divide the good players into teams evenly

애쓰다 = to struggle, to try to, to put effort into doing something

Common Usages:
괜히 애쓰다 = to put effort into something in vain

Examples:
가끔은 아무리 애써도 해결되지 않는 일도 있어요
= Sometimes there are work/problems that can’t be resolved no matter how hard you struggle

부장님은 우리회사가 행사를 개최할 때 끝까지 애써 달라고 했어요
= When we host this event, the boss requested that we try our best

성공하기 위해 매일 애쓰는 사람들을 보면 대단하면서도 안타까워요
= When I see people struggling to try to succeed, it is amazing but also sad at the same time

개최하다 = to host an event

Common Usages:
개최국 = host country
행사를 개최하다 = to host an event
올림픽을 개최하다 = to host the Olympics

Examples:
사람이 많거나 적거나 그 행사를 개최해야 돼요
= If there is many people, or few people, we (still) need to hold the event

부장님은 우리회사가 행사를 개최할 때 끝까지 애써 달라고 했어요
= When we host this event, the boss requested that we try our best

입주하다 = to move into a new house

The pronunciation of this word is closer to “입쭈하다”

Examples:
다음 주에 입주할 거라서 그때 와 달라고 했어요
= We will be moving into the new house next week, so I told them to come then

우리가 입주하기 전에 새로운 가구를 사야 돼요
= Before moving into our new house, we need to buy all new furniture

묶다 = to tie

The pronunciation of this word is closer to “묵따”

Examples:
신발끈을 묶거나 신발을 벗으세요 = Tie your shoes or take them off

머리가 완전히 헝클어져서 다시 머리를 묶는 동안 잠깐 기다려 주세요
= My hair is all tangled (messed up) so please wait a minute while I tie my hair again

머리를 묶기 전에 빗으로 잘 빗어주면 더 예쁜 머리를 할 수 있어요
= Before you tie up your hair, if you comb it well you can get prettier hair

Passive Verbs:
풀리다 = to be untied

The active form of this word is “풀다” (to untie)

Common Usages:
긴장이 풀리다 = to be relieved

Examples:
신발끈이 풀려 있어서 묶으라고 했어요
= I told him to tie his shoes because they were untied

어제 컨디션이 좋아서 어려운 수학문제가 술술 풀렸어요
= Yesterday, my body condition was good so I could easily/smoothly solve math problems

친구들이랑 바다에서 물놀이를 했더니 스트레스가 풀렸어요
= I went to the sea with friends and played in the water, and now my stress has melted away

Adjectives:
지치다 = to be exhausted, to be tired, to be worn out

Common Usages:
심신이 지치다 = for one’s body and mind to be exhausted

Examples:
마음이 지쳐 아무것도 하기 싫을 때는 휴식을 취하는 게 좋아요
= It is good to take a break when you are exhausted and don’t feel like doing anything

세상이 더 바쁘게 돌아갈수록 심신이 지쳐가는 사람들이 많아져요
= As the world gets busier and busier, there are more people get are getting more exhausted

풍부하다 = to be plentiful, to be abundant

Common Usages:
자원이 풍부하다 = for resources to be abundant

Examples:
블루베리는 비타민이 풍부해서 매일매일 먹으면 좋아요
= Blueberries are rich in vitamins, so it is good to eat them each and every day

비타민이 풍부하게 들어가 있는 과일만 사 달라고 했어요
= I requested to only buy fruit that is abundant with vitamins (fruits rich in vitamins)

자원이 풍부한 나라일수록 미래에 더 발전할 가능성이 있어요
= As a country has more resources, there is more of a possibility for it to develop

Adverbs and Other Words:
뜻밖에 = unexpectedly

The pronunciation of this word is closer to “뜯빠께”

Examples:
뜻밖에 길에서 돈을 주어서 그 돈으로 저녁을 사 먹었어요
= I used the money that I unexpectedly picked up on the street to buy dinner

선생님이 수업을 하다가 갑자기 교장선생님이 뜻밖에 들어오셔서 선생님이 긴장한 것이 티가 났어요
= When the principal unexpectedly entered the classroom as the teacher was doing class, it was obvious that the teacher was nervous

For help memorizing these words, try using our Memrise tool.

 

Introduction

In this lesson, you will continue to learn about quoted sentences. You will learn how to say that one asks for something, or requests for something to be done. Let’s get started.

 

 

Quoted Imperative Sentences with 주다: ~달라고

In Lesson 40, you learned how to create imperative sentences. For example:

신입사원을 만나러 나가 = Go out to meet the new employee
매출이 왜 떨어졌는지 설명해라 = Explain to me why the sales dropped

In Lesson 52, you learned how to make quoted sentences. For example:

우리가 지난 주에 영화를 네 편 봤다고 했어요 = I said that we saw four movies last week
설문조사를 벌써 작성했다고 했어요 = I said that I already filled out the survey

In Lesson 54, you learned how to make quoted imperative sentences, for example:

신발끈이 풀려 있어서 묶으라고 했어요 = I told him to tie his shoes because they were untied
고급시험을 봐 보라고 했어요 = I told him to try to write the advanced exam

Finally, in Lesson 41, you learned how to use 주다 to ask for an object, or ~아/어 주다 to ask for an action to be completed. For example:

그 펜을 주세요 = Please give me that pen
나를 내버려둬 주세요 = Please leave me alone

When quoting a sentence like this (a sentence that ends with 주다 in the imperative mood), the sentence changes differently compared to what you learned in Lesson 54. If ~(으)라고 were added to 주다, the acting agent within the quoted sentence would be telling the listener to give/do something to another person. For example, if I said:

성경에게 학생에게 펜을 라고 했어요

I used the term “acting agent” in the explanation above to refer to the person who is acting within the quote. In the example sentence above, I am talking to my friend 성경, and I am telling her to give the pen to the student. In the underlined section of the sentence, 성경 would be the person giving the pen – and I refer to this as the “acting agent.” It’s a little bit confusing because there are three people: Me, who is speaking to 성경 and telling her what to do; 성경, who is listening to me and acting within the quote; and the student who is neither speaking nor listening, but receives the pen from 성경.

I could take out the “student” whom 성경 gives the pen to and the sentence would still work – it just wouldn’t specifically indicate who is receiving the pen. For example:

성경에게 펜을 라고 했어요 =I told 성경 to give (you) the pen
(or to somebody who we can’t know in this sentence)

As you can see, 주다 can be used in quoted imperative sentences, but only to quote that one tells a person to give something to another person. This can create some confusion.

When the original speaker of the quoted sentence asks for an object to be given to him/her (or for an action to be done for him/her) using ~주다 (or ~아/어 주다), 주다 should be replaced by the verb 달다.

달다 is a verb, but you don’t really need to memorize it as a word in your vocabulary studies. It’s typically only used in these situations – as a substitute for “주다” in quoted imperative sentences. As a standalone verb, it technically means “to request.”

Let’s look at a very simple example:

A. Person 1: 밥(을) 주세요 = Give me rice
B. Person 2: 뭐라고? = What did you say?
C. Person 1: 밥(을) 달라고 했어요 = I said “give me rice”

Here, the original speaker of the quoted sentence (seen at A) is asking for rice. Therefore, when I quote that sentence (the final quoted sentence can be seen at C), I use 달다 instead of 주다 because the original speaker is asking for an object to be given to him.

Notice that I underlined the words “original speaker of the quoted sentence” above. I did this to emphasize that – in order to use 달다 in these sentences, the speaker of the final sentence doesn’t need to be “I/me.” Regardless of who says the final sentence, if somebody requests something be given (or be done) to him/her, and that sentence is quoted, 달다 should be used instead of 주다.

These explanations are making my head spin because there are so many people we are talking about. Let’s look at another simple conversation that I think will help you understand what I’m trying to say.

A. Person 1: 밥(을) 주세요 = Give me rice
B. Person 2: 뭐라고? = What did you say?
C. Person 3: 밥(을) 달라고 했어요 = He said “give me rice”

Here, the original speaker of the quoted sentence (seen at A) is asking for rice. The speaker of the final sentence (seen at C) is not the same person who originally asked for the rice. Regardless, when Person 3 quotes that sentence (the final quoted sentence can be seen at C), 달다 should be used instead of 주다 because the original speaker is asking for an object to be given to him.

달다 is sometimes translated to “request” in these situations. For example:

A. Person 1: Give me rice
B. Person 2: What did you say?
C. Person 3: He requested rice

I can see why this translation is often used, but I prefer to use “give” as a translation. Remember, we’re dealing with quoted sentences here and in my mind saying “request” doesn’t fully take in the meaning that we’ve created.

To go back to what we looked at before, ~(으)라고 can be added to 주다 if the original speaker of the quoted sentence asks for an object to be given to somebody else. For example:

A. Person 1: 애기에게 밥을 줘 = Give the baby rice
B. Person 2: 뭐라고? = What did you say?
C. Person 3: 애기에게 밥을 주라고 했어 = I said “give the baby rice”

Let’s look at many examples of ~(으)라고 being used with 달다:

휴지를 달라고 했어요 = I said “please give me a tissue”
맥주 한 병을 달라고 했어요 = I said “please give me one bottle of beer”
엄마가 숟가락과 칼을 달라고 했어 = Mom said “please give me a spoon and a knife”
우리 아들은 계속 용돈을 달라고 졸라요 = Our son keeps pestering for pocket money
부장은 사원에게 창고에 있는 자전거를 달라고 했어요 = The boss said to his employee “give me a bike from the warehouse.”

As I mentioned, it is also possible to use 달다 when the original speaker of a quoted sentence asks for an action to be done for him/her. In essence, 달다 replaces 주다 in ~아/어 주다 in these cases. For example:

저의 머리카락을 꼬지 말아 달라고 했어요
= I told her to please stop twisting my hair

학생은 선생님에게 성적을 올려 달라고 했어요
= The student said to the teacher “raise my grades”

다음 주에 입주할 거라서 그때 와 달라고 했어요
= We will be moving into the new house next week, so I told them to come then

비타민이 풍부하게 들어가 있는 과일만 사 달라고 했어요
= I requested to only buy fruit that is abundant with vitamins (fruits rich in vitamins)

어떤 공무원이 우리 집에 와서 설문조사를 답해 달라고 했어요
= Some government worker came to our house and requested that we answer a survey

그들에게 조용히 해 달라고 했지만 그들은 아직 너무 시끄러워요
= I told them to “please be quiet,” but they are still very loud

부장님은 우리회사가 행사를 개최할 때 끝까지 애써 달라고 했어요
= When we host this event, the boss requested that we try our best

할아버지가 이 컴퓨터를 어떻게 쓰는지를 설명해 달라고 했지만 세대 차이 때문에 아주 힘들었어요 = Grandpa asked me to explain how to use this computer to him, but it was difficult because of the generation gap

 

 

 

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Favor: 부탁

부탁 often translates to “favor” and can be used as a noun in sentences. For example:

저는 부탁이 하나 있어요 = I have one favor

Another common translation for 부탁 is “a request.” For example:

저는 부탁이 하나 있어요 = I have one request

In English, we often use the word “favor” to ask if somebody can do something for you. For example:

Can I ask you for a favor? or,
Can you do me a favor?

In Korean, you can create similar sentences using the word 부탁 by attaching~하다 to 부탁. 부탁하다 is a verb that you can translate to “to ask for a favor” or “to request a favor.” For example:

저는 더 자세한 설명을 부탁했어요 = I asked for a clearer explanation.

I translated the sentence above as “I asked for a clearer explanation” but it could just as easily be “I asked a favor for the explanation to be clearer” or “I requested a clearer explanation.”

부탁하다 is often used with a noun that refers to some sort of task or work. 부탁하다 is then used to ask the listener to “take care of” that task. For example:

It’s really hard to translate these sentences directly. Don’t look at the English translations below as direct translations of the Korean sentences. Rather, try to understand that their meanings are equivalent:

남편에게 청소를 부탁했어요 = I asked my husband to take care of the cleaning (for me)
저는 신입사원에게 그 일을 부탁했어요 = I asked the new employee to take care of that work (for me)
빨래를 아들에게 부탁하고 집에서 나왔어요 = I asked my son to take care of the laundry for me and left the house

In the example sentences so far, 부탁하다 has come after a noun. If the favor (or what you are requesting) is an action, you can attach ~아/어 달라고 to the verb, followed by 부탁하다. For example:

밥을 빨리 만들어 달라고 부탁했어요 = I asked him to make (the rice) quickly
저는 그에게 더 자세히 설명해 달라고 부탁했어요 = I asked him to explain it more clearly

One more peculiar thing about the word “부탁하다” is that it is often said as “부탁(을) 드리다.” You learned in Lesson 39 that “드리다” is the honorific form of “주다” and is used when the receiving person deserves high respect. When using “부탁,” the person receiving the favor is you, and you should never use 드리다 when talking about yourself receiving something. That being said, “부탁(을) 드리다” is a common way to end these types of sentences.

In order to get around “yourself” being on the receiving end of the verb 드리다, I guess you could translate 부탁 to “request” in these cases. If translated like this, the request is given to the person who deserves high respect.

밥을 빨리 만들어 달라고 부탁 드렸어요 = I asked him to make (the rice) quickly
엄마에게 그것을 사 달라고 부탁 드렸어요 = I asked my mother to buy that for me

That’s it for this lesson!

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