Lesson 67: Like: ~처럼, As if: ~는 듯이, ~듯이

Click here for Korean Short Stories specifically tailored to learners at this level.
Click here for a Workbook to go along with this lesson.

This Lesson is also available in Español

Jump to:

Vocabulary
Introduction

Like (a noun): (명사)처럼
As if…: ~듯(이)
마치

 

Vocabulary

Nouns:
상식 = common sense

Common Usages:
상식이 없다 = to have no common sense

Examples:
바보처럼 왜 이렇게 상식이 없어? = Why, like an idiot, do you not have any common sense?

그 문제를 풀고 싶으면 유일하게 필요한 것은 상식이에요
= If you want to solve that problem, the only thing you need is common sense

한국의 건국신화는 모두가 알아야 하는 상식입니다
= Korea’s “birth myth” is common knowledge that all people need to know

마감일 = deadline

Common Usages:
신청마감일 = application deadline
접수 마감일 = the final date to receive something

Examples:
이 프로젝트 마감일이 내일이라 서둘러야 해요
= The deadline for this project is tomorrow, so we need to hurry

마감일까지 숙제를 다 하려고 미친 듯이 공부를 했다
= In order to finish all of my homework by the deadline, he studied as if he was crazy

어제가 시험 문제 출제 마감일이라서 다 하고 12시 넘어서 잤어요
= Yesterday was the deadline for creating exam questions, so I did them all and slept after 12

구멍 = hole, pit

Notes: Another way to say that you have a hole in your clothing (like pants or socks) is to say
“빵구 났다.”

Common Usages:
구멍 = nostril (nose hole)
구멍이 났다 = to have a hole in something

Examples:
가방에 크게 벌어져 있는 구멍이 있어요 = There is a big hole in my bag
누가 나의 심장에 구멍을 내듯이 아주 아파 = I am sore as if somebody is digging a hole in my heart
구멍이 난 바지를 입은 채 학교에 갔어요 = I went to school wearing pants with holes in them
저는 구멍을 신문지로 덮었어요 = I covered the hole with newspaper
법의 구멍을 남용해서 이익을 얻는 사람들이 많다 = There are many people that abuse holes in the law to get benefits

경력 = career/work experience

Common Usages:
경력직 = a job for people with a lot of experience

Examples:
당신의 경력을 이 일에 응용하면 좋을 것 같아요
= It’ll probably be good if you apply your experience to this task/job

체육선생님이 되고 싶으면 체력은 경력처럼 중요해요
= If you want to become a P.E. teacher, your physical strength, like your experience, is important

체력 = physical strength

Common Usages:
강철체력 = to be very strong (and healthy)

Examples:
우리 아들은 아빠처럼 체력이 아주 강해요/좋아요
= Our son, like his father, is very strong (his physical strength is very strong)

체육선생님이 되고 싶으면 체력은 경력처럼 중요해요
= If you want to become a P.E. teacher, your physical strength, like your experience, is important

검진 = physical checkup/health screening

Common Usages:
건강검진 = health checkup
정기검진 = regular (health) checkup

Examples:
저는 매년 건강을 위해 정기검진을 받아요
= I get a regular checkup every year for my health

여기서 일하기 전에 건강 검진을 받아서 저희에게 결과를 보내 주세요
= Before you (start) work(ing) here, please get a health check and send the results to us

자녀 = children/sons and daughters

Common Usages:
자녀보호 = parnetal controls

Examples:
선생님들이 자기 자녀들을 대하는 것처럼 학생들을 대해요
= Teachers treat students like they treat their own children

아버지는 자녀를 보고 그들을 알아보지 못하는 듯이 그냥 지나갔어요
= The father looked at his children and just walked past them as if he didn’t recognize them

자동 = automatic

Common Usages:
자동문 = automatic door
반자동 = semi-automatic

Examples:
이 매트리스가 자동으로 펴져요 = This mattress automatically unfolds

우리 아버지처럼 돈을 자동적으로 벌 수 있었으면 좋겠어요
= I wish I could earn money automatically like my dad

아침에 중요한 회의가 있어서 눈이 자동으로 떠졌어요
= I had an important meeting this morning, so my eyes opened automatically (woke up automatically)

크기 = size

Notes: The Konglish “사이즈” is also very common. It seems strange to an English speaker, but it is common to say something like “크기가 너무 크다” or “크기가 너무 작다.” This would directly translate to “the size is too big” or “the size is too small.” You’d think that you would just get right to the point and say “it’s too big” or it’s too small.”

Common Usages:
크기를 줄이다 = to decrease the size of
크기를 늘리다 = to increase the size of

Examples:
몇몇 사람들은 왼발이 오른발보다 크기가 커요 = Some people’s left foot is larger than their right foot
글자 크기가 클수록 더 많은 사람들이 쉽게 볼 수 있어요 = The bigger the font is, the easier people will see it

폭포 = waterfall

Common Usages:
나이아가라폭포 = Niagra Falls
이과수폭포 = Iguazu Falls
빅토리아폭포 = Victoria Falls

Examples:
폭포가 떨어지듯이 그는 눈물을 흘렸다 = He cried (water flowed from his eyes) as if it was a waterfall
제주도에 가면 멋있는 폭포가 여러 곳에 있어요 = If you go to Jeju, there are cool waterfalls in a lot of places

바보 = an idiot (often used as a cute way to say a silly person)

Common Usages:
바보같이 = like an idiot

Examples:
바보처럼 왜 이렇게 상식이 없어? = Why, like an idiot, do you not have any common sense?
저와 저의 와이프를 장난으로 서로 바보라고 불러요 = My wife and I call eachother 바보 as a joke

시련 = some kind of hardship

Common Usages:
큰 시련 = a big hardship
시련을 겪다 = = to undergo some sort of hardship
시련을 극복하다 = to overcome some sort of difficult situation

Examples:
시련에도 불구하고 저는 그 일을 해냈어요
= I finished that work despite the hardship/problems

우리는 이렇게 어려운 시련을 절대 극복하지 않을 거예요
= We will never overcome this difficult situation

우리는 이런 시련을 한 단계씩 극복할 수 있어요
= We can overcome this difficult time one step/stage at a time

어려운 시련을 극복하는 과정에서 인생에서 제일 중요한 것을 배웠어요
= I learned that overcoming difficult hardships is the most important thing in life

그 아이가 어려운 시련을 겪고 있는 듯이 수업 시간 동안 집중을 안 하고 울기만 해요
= During class, that boy doesn’t concentrate and only cries as if he is undergoing a difficult hardship

머릿속 = the inside of one’s head

Common Usages:
머릿속에 맴돌다 = for something to go through one’s mind
머릿속에 떠오르다 = for something to come to one’s mind

Examples:
그 사람이 한 말이 제 머릿속에 계속 맴돌아요
= What that person said constantly is going through my mind

시간이 지나면서 머릿속에서 어린 시절의 기억이 삭제되듯이 하나도 없다
= As time goes by, as if is (being) deleted, I don’t have any memory of my childhood days

어젯밤 계속해서 제가 좋아하는 사람의 얼굴이 머릿속에 맴돌아서 잠을 한 숨도 못 잤어요
= I couldn’t sleep at all last night because the face of the person that I like kept going through my mind

Verbs:
담당하다 = to take responsibility, to be in charge of

Common Usages:
담당자 = person in charge
담당부서 = department in charge

Examples:
제가 보안을 담당하는 사람이라서 다른 직원처럼 일찍 못 나가요
= I am the person in charge of security, so I can’t leave early like most other workers

그 일을 담당하는 사람이 저밖에 없기 때문에 그 종이를 저한테 주셔야 합니다
= I am the only person in charge of that job, so you have to give that paper to me

삭제하다 = to delete (files, names, etc…)

Examples:

저는 컴퓨터에 모든 파일을 실수로 삭제했어요
= I mistakenly deleted all of the files on my computer

그 사람이 못 온다고 해서 그 사람 이름을 목록에서 삭제하면 돼요
= That person says he can’t come, so we can delete that person’s name from the list

겪다 = to experience, to undergo

Common Usages:
시련을 겪다 = to undergo some sort of hardship

Examples:
십대에는 사춘기를 겪으면서 많은 아이들이 부모님께 말대답을 해요
= Many teenagers talk back to their parents while going through puberty

그 모든 불행한 일을 겪고도 미소를 그렇게 자주 짓는 것은 어렵지 않아요
= Even after experiencing (going through) all that unhappiness, it is not difficult to smile often like that

그 아이가 어려운 시련을 겪고 있는 듯이 수업 시간 동안 집중을 안 하고 울기만 해요
= During class, that boy doesn’t concentrate and only cries as if he is undergoing a difficult hardship

학생들이 사춘기를 겪고 있기 때문에 학생들을 성별로 나눠서 그 영상을 보여줘야 될 것 같아요
= Because students are going through puberty, we will probably have to divide them by sex and show that video to them

잔소리하다 = to nag

Common Usages:
말끝마다 잔소리하다 = for somebody to nag a lot

Examples:
제가 무슨 잘못을 한 듯이 우리 엄마가 저에게 잔소리를 했어요
= My mom scolded/nagged at me as if I had done some sort of mistake

우리 엄마가 저한테 매일 잔소리를 해서 학교 끝나고 집에 가고 싶지 않아요
= My mom always nags me, no I don’t want to go home after school

생산하다 = to produce

Common Usages:
생산자 = producer

Examples:
천연 꿀을 생산하기 위해서는 벌이 필요해요 = Bees are necessary to produce natural honey

제품 생산을 중단하는 게 아니라 그 문제를 해결해서 곧 다시 생산할 거예요
= It is not that we are halting production of this product, it is just that we are fixing the problem and we will soon produce it again

협의하다 = to discuss, to consult

Common Usages:
피해자와 협의하다 = to consult with a victim
피의자와 협의하다 = to consult with a suspect

Examples:
저의 변호사는 오늘 피의자를 만나서 이 문제에 대해 협의할 거에요
= My lawyer says today he will meet with the suspect and discuss (about) that issue/problem

오늘 구청에서 새 건물을 짓는 것에 대해 담당자와 협의할 거에요
= Today I will go to the district office and discuss/consult about the building/making of a new building

퇴장하다 = to leave

Examples:
그 가수는 무대에서 쓸쓸히 퇴장했다
= That singer trudged in a lonely manner off the stage
(It is very difficult to translate “쓸쓸히.” It is used when somebody sort of goes through something with nobody around them. In this situation, it could mean that the singer literally left the stage in a “sad/lonely” way because nobody was watching. It would also mean that the singer left his career in a sad/lonely” way because his popularity dropped.)

밤 10시까지 모든 직원들은 건물에서 퇴장 해주시길 바랍니다
= All workers, please leave the building by 10 o’clock

당기다 = to pull

Notes: In addition to using 당기다 to indicate that one “pulls” an object, it is also used to indicate that one likes, prefers or wants something. It would be similar to saying something like “I’m being pulled by pizza.” Of course, we would never say that in English, but you can see what I mean. In Korean, you would say something like:

나는 피자가 당겨 = I want/prefer/like pizza

Common Usages:
밧줄을 당기다 = to pull a rope

Examples:
‘미세요’라는 스티커를 못 보는 듯이 문을 당겨 봤어요
= He tried pulling on the door as if he didn’t see the “push” sticker

오늘은 치킨이 당겨서 집에 가자마자 시켜 먹을 거에요
= Today, I prefer/feel like chicken, so as soon as I get home I will order it and eat it

밀다 = to push

Examples:
침대를 이쪽으로 살짝 밀어 주세요
= Please push the bed a little bit this way

‘미세요’라는 스티커를 못 보는 듯이 문을 당겨 봤어요
= He tried pulling on the door as if he didn’t see the “push” sticker

비비다 = to mix

Common Usages:
비빔밥 = mixed rice (Bibimbap)
눈을 비비다 = to rub one’s eyes

Examples:
재료를 비빔밥처럼 비벼야 돼요 = Mix the ingredients like 비빔밥
숟가락으로 이렇게 비비면 돼요 = You can mix it with a spoon like this
재료를 다 섞고 10분 동안 비비세요 = After putting all of the ingredients together, mix them for 10 minutes

파다 = to dig

Common Usages:
코를 파다 = to pick one’s nose

Examples:
코를 파다가 코피가 났어요 = I was picking my nose and then it started bleeding
그 사람을 우연히 땅을 파다가 큰 금을 발견했어요 = That person was randomly digging and happened to discover/strike gold

소지하다 = to possess

Common Usages:
소지품 = one’s possessions
소지금지물품 = restricted items (items that you are not allowed to possess)

Examples:
그 사람이 무기를 소지한 듯이 움직이기 시작했어요
= That person started moving as if he possessed a weapon

버스 기사님은 승객들에게 소지품을 꼭 챙기라고 했어요
= The bus driver told the passengers to make sure they take their personal belongings with them

가입하다 = to become a member/join a club

Common Usages:
회원가입을 하다 = to join/become a member
신규가입을 하다 = for a new member to join

Examples:
저의 형처럼 그 동아리에 가입하고 싶어요 = Like my brother, I want to enter that club
오늘 신규가입을 하면 가입선물로 포인트를 더 줘요 = If you become a (new) member today, we will give you more points as a signup bonus/present

For help memorizing these words, try using our Memrise tool.

 

Introduction

In this lesson, you will learn the meanings of ~처럼 and ~듯(이). These are often used to indicate that an action is done “like” something else. We will go over the meanings of both of them, and describe the differences in this lesson. Let’s get started.

 

Like (a noun): (명사)처럼

When ~처럼 is attached to a noun, it often indicates that an action is done “like” the way the specified noun does it. Let’s look at a simple example:

아빠가 밥을 먹고 있어요 = Dad is eating (rice)

By using ~처럼, I can indicate that my father is eating rice “like” the way a pig eats. For example:

돼지처럼 = like a pig
아빠가 돼지처럼 먹고 있어요 = Dad is eating (rice) like a pig

Here are some other examples of ~처럼 being attached to nouns:

나처럼 = like me
예전처럼 = like old times
평소처럼 = like (as) usual
원숭이처럼 = like a monkey
그 전처럼 = like before

These constructions can then be placed in sentences similar to adverbs to say that something is done “like” something. For example:

저는 그 전처럼 하고 싶어요 = I want to do it like before
재료를 비빔밥처럼 비벼야 돼요 = Mix the ingredients like 비빔밥
강아지처럼 구멍을 파고 있어요 = I am digging a hole like a dog/puppy
그 사람은 나처럼 돈이 별로 없어 = That person, like me, doesn’t have much money
저는 오늘 평소처럼 공부해야 돼요 = I have to study today, as usual
바보처럼 왜 이렇게 상식이 없어요? = Why, like an idiot, do you not have any common sense?
우리 아들은 밥을 원숭이처럼 먹어요 = Our son eats (rice) like a monkey
저의 형처럼 그 동아리에 가입하고 싶어요 = Like my brother, I want to enter that club
우리는 예전처럼 그냥 집에서 영화를 봤어요 = We watched movies at our house like old times

부장님처럼 그렇게 일찍 나가도 되었으면 좋겠어요
= I wish I was able to leave (go out) early (like that) like the boss

체육선생님이 되고 싶으면 체력은 경력처럼 중요해요
= If you want to become a P.E. teacher, your physical strength, like your experience, is important

우리 아버지처럼 돈을 자동적으로 벌 수 있었으면 좋겠어요
= I wish I could earn money automatically like my dad

제가 보안을 담당하는 사람이라서 다른 직원처럼 일찍 못 나가요
= I am the person in charge of security, so I can’t leave early like most other workers

If you are indicating that something happens in a place, and you want to describe the similarities with that action happening in another place, ~처럼 can be attached to ~에서. For example:

유럽에서처럼 매일 아침에 빵을 먹고 싶어요
= Like in Europe, I want to eat bread every morning

그 극장에서 공연을 보고 싶으면 영화관에서처럼 표를 사야 돼요
= If you want to see a performance at that theatre, like (at) a movie, you need to buy a ticket

~처럼 can also be attached to nouns described by phrases using the ~는 것 construction. By describing a noun with an entire clause, you are able to make more complicated and descriptive sentences. For example, the following two sentences are similar, but included in the meaning of the second example is the context that comes along with ~았/었던 (you might want to check out Lesson 27 to see my discussion about this meaning):

우리가 예전처럼 이것을 하고 싶어요 = I want to do it like old times
우리가 예전에 자주 했던 것처럼 이것을 하고 싶어요 = I want to do it like we used to do it a long time ago

In Lesson 36 you learned how to say a person looks like something else. For example:

저의 여자친구는 연예인 같이 보여요 = My girlfriend looks like a celebrity

You can use ~처럼 to describe that a particular scenario “looks like” something. In these sentences as well, you can see how the noun that ~처럼 is attached to is being described by a clause. For example:

네가 넘어질 것처럼 보였어 = It looked like you were going to fall
그렇게 하면 문제가 생길 것처럼 보여요 = It looks like a problem will come up if we do it like that

~듯(이) is similar to ~처럼. I will cover this in the next section.

.


As if…: ~()

By describing ~듯(이) with a clause using ~는 것, you can create the meaning of “as if…” For example:

그를 알아보지 못하는 듯이… = As if he didn’t recognize him…
그가 이해하지 못하는 듯이… = As if he didn’t understand…
그는 떠나기 싫다는 듯이… = As if he didn’t want to leave…
그가 죽은 듯이… = As if he were dead
가고 싶지 않은 듯이… = As if one doesn’t want to go…

These constructions can then be put in sentences similar to adverbs:

그는 떠나기 싫다는 듯이 울었어요 = He cried as if he didn’t want to leave
그는 이해하지 못하는 듯이 행동했어요 = He acted as if he didn’t understand
그는 죽은 듯이 바닥에 누워 있었어요 = He lay on the ground as if he were dead

마감일까지 숙제를 다 하려고 미친 듯이 공부를 했다
= In order to finish all of my homework by the deadline, he studied as if he was crazy

그 사람이 무기를 소지한 듯이 움직이기 시작했어요
= That person started moving as if he possessed a weapon

‘미세요’라는 스티커를 못 보는 듯이 문을 당겨 봤어요
= He tried pulling on the door as if he didn’t see the “push” sticker

제가 무슨 잘못을 한 듯이 우리 엄마가 저에게 잔소리를 했어요
= My mom scolded/nagged at me as if I had done some sort of mistake

아버지는 자녀를 보고 그들을 알아보지 못하는 듯이 그냥 지나갔어요
= The father looked at his children and just walked past them as if he didn’t recognize them

건강검진결과를 모르는 듯이 오빠가 아직 건강에 나쁘게 먹고 있어요
= My brother keeps eating unhealthy food as if he doesn’t know about his health check results

제가 가자고 했지만 애기는 가고 싶지 않은 듯이 계속 자고 일어나지 않았어요
= I said “let’s go,” but the baby kept sleeping as if he didn’t want to go

그 아이가 어려운 시련을 겪고 있는 듯이 수업 시간 동안 집중을 안 하고 울기만 해요
= During class, that boy doesn’t concentrate and only cries as if he is undergoing a difficult hardship

~듯이 can also be placed directly to the stem of a verb/adjective to have a very similar meaning to the sentences above. However, there is a difference between using 듯이 after a descriptive word (as shown above) and adding ~듯이 directly to a verb/adjective. Assuming the verb is “하다” the different forms would look like this:

~하는 듯이
~하듯이

In general, the translation of both is “as if…” which makes distinguishing the two very difficult for foreigners.

In the sentences above (where 듯이 is not attached directly to the stem), the nuance is that the clause before 듯이 is somewhat of a guess. For example:

그는 이해하지 못하는 듯이 행동했어요
= He acted as if he didn’t understand
(I guess/it looked like he didn’t understand)

그는 떠나기 싫다는 듯이 울었어요
= He cried as if he didn’t want to leave
(I guess/it looked like he didn’t want to leave)

‘미세요’라는 스티커를 못 보는 듯이 문을 당겨 봤어요
= He tried pulling on the door as if he didn’t see the “push” sticker
(I guess he didn’t see the “push” sticker”)

아버지는 자녀를 보고 그들을 알아보지 못하는 듯이 그냥 지나갔어요
= The father looked at his children and just walked past them as if he didn’t recognize them
(I guess/it looks he didn’t recognize his children)

제가 가자고 했지만 애기는 가고 싶지 않은 듯이 계속 자고 일어나지 않았어요
= I said “let’s go,” but the baby kept sleeping as if he didn’t want to go
(I guess/it looked like the baby didn’t want to go)

그 아이가 어려운 시련을 겪고 있는 듯이 수업 시간 동안 집중을 안 하고 울기만 해요
= During class, that boy doesn’t concentrate and only cries as if he is undergoing a difficult hardship
(He doesn’t concentrate in class, and just cries. I guess he is undergoing a difficult hardship)

When used like this, the two clauses (the clause before 듯이, and the clause after) have a direct relationship with each other. For example, in the first example above, the way that the person acted was a result of him not understanding.

However, when adding ~듯이 directly to a stem of a verb or adjective, one is indicating that the two clauses (the one before ~듯이, and the one after) are exactly the same (there is no guessing involved). However, the clause before ~듯이 is usually some ridiculous metaphor that (although “describing the situation”) is completely unrelated to the situation in the second clause. For example:

그는 물을 쓰듯이 돈을 썼다
= He used money as if it was water

말이 날뛰듯이 그의 심장이 뛰었다
= His heart was racing, as if a horse were bucking

폭포가 떨어지듯이 그는 눈물을 흘렸다
= He cried (water flowed from his eyes) as if it was a waterfall

누가 나의 심장에 구멍을 내듯이 아주 아파
= I am sore as if somebody is digging a hole in my heart

시간이 지나면서 머릿속에서 어린 시절의 기억이 삭제되듯이 하나도 없다
= As time goes by, as if is (being) deleted, I don’t have any memory of my childhood days

(Notice that adding something that starts with “” causes no irregulars to come into play, so it is very easy to add this to stems).

(Also notice that I deliberately used the plain form conjugation in these five examples because the most common place you would find these sentences would be in novels. In novels (in Korean and in English), authors often create these metaphors to create imagery for the reader. Very rarely would one use these ridiculous metaphors in everyday conversation).

As you can see from the five examples above – there is no real connection between the first and second clauses. Their only relation is that they are linked by the feeling of the metaphor being described in the first clause. For example, in the first example above, the waterfall has no relation to the actual situation, and is only used to create a feeling inside the listener/reader.

However, in the examples discussed previously:

아버지는 자녀를 보고 그들을 알아보지 못하는 듯이 그냥 지나갔어요 = The father looked at his children and just walked past them as if he didn’t recognize them

(I guess/it looks he didn’t recognize him)

… there is no metaphor that is being described. The speaker is simply saying that the ‘person looked at his father and walked past him’ and it appeared/seemed like ‘he didn’t recognize him.’

In all cases above, the “이” can be removed from “듯이” and the sentence will have the same meaning. However, I personally always say it as “듯이,” so I presented it that way in this lesson. I feel that it is hard to end the clause with “ㅅ” and it flows off my tongue better when I say“ 듯이.”

There is also a word “듯하다” which can be placed at the end of a sentence to mean “it seems like.” 듯하다 is usually placed immediately after a descriptive clause that is describing “듯하다.” For example:

선생님은 이것을 잘 모르는 듯해요 = The teacher seems if he doesn’t understand this
그가 안 간 듯해요 = It seems as though he didn’t go

 

 

마치

The word “마치” is another one of those words that is put in sentences to allow the listener to expect what the speaker will say and provide feeling. In Lesson 43, you learned that 만약 is used in sentences where there is a supposition or assumption being made. For example:

만약 네가 안 가면 나도 안 가 = If you are not going, I am not going

In Lesson 48, you learned that 아무리 is used in sentences with ~아/어도. For example:

아무리 그 여자가 예뻐도 저는 그녀가 싫어요 = Regardless of how pretty that girl is, I don’t like her

In similar function of 만약 and 아무리, 마치 is often used in sentences to give the listener the expectation or feeling that one situation will be likened to another. Therefore, it is common to see 마치 used in sentences with ~처럼 or ~듯이. For example:

마치 말처럼 달렸어요 = He ran like a horse
마치 그는 죽은 듯이 바닥에 누워 있었어요 = He lay on the floor as if he were dead

That’s it for this lesson!

Okay, got it! Take me to the next lesson! Or,

Click here for Korean Short Stories specifically tailored to learners at this level.
Click here for a Workbook to go along with this lesson.