Lesson 50: ~ㄹ/을 예정, 계획, 준비

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Vocabulary
Introduction

I am scheduled to… : ~ㄹ/을 예정
I have plans to…: ~ㄹ/을 계획
To be ready…: ~ㄹ/을 준비

 

Vocabulary

Click on the English word to see information and examples of that word in use. You might not be able to understand all of the grammar within the example sentences, but any grammar you can’t understand will eventually be introduced in later lessons. Use these sentences to give yourself a feel for how each word can be used, and maybe even to expose yourself to the grammar that you will be learning shortly.

A PDF file neatly presenting these words and extra information can be found here.

Nouns:
포도 = grape

Common Usages:
포도주스 = grape juice
포도즙 = grape juice
포도주 = wine
건포도 = raisin

Examples:
저는 씨앗이 없는 포도만 좋아요 = I only like seedless grapes
포도를 오랫동안 발효시키면 포도주가 돼요 = If you ferment grapes for a long time, wine is formed

껍질 = the peel, skin, bark of a fruit, vegetable or plant

The pronunciation of this word is closer to “껍찔”

Notes: When referring to the outside portion of a plant (for example, a fruit or vegetable), you can generally refer to that part as “껍질” in Korean. In English, the word changes depending on the specific plant. For example:

사과껍질 = apple peal
땅콩껍질 = peanut shell
계란껍질 = egg shell
파인애플껍질 = pineapple bark
빵껍질 = the crust of bread
껍질을 벗기다 = to take off the peel, crust, shell

Examples:
양파껍질을 다 벗겨 주세요 = Please take the peel off of the onion
키위를 먹으면 껍질을 안 벗겨도 맛있어요 = Even if you don’t peel the skin off of a kiwi when you eat it, it is delicious

복숭아 = peach

The pronunciation of this word is closer to “복쑹아”

Example:
어제 복숭아를 샀는데 다 상했어요 = I bought peaches yesterday, but they’re all bad

참외 = oriental melon

The pronunciation of this word is closer to “차뫼”

Notes: In most western countries (Canada for sure), we do not have this fruit. It is yellow and white and oval shaped.

Examples:
참외껍질을 벗길 준비가 됐어요? = Are you ready to cut the skin off of the oriental melon?

수능 = the Korean SAT

Notes: 수능 is short for “대학수학능력평가” and is a test that happens once per year every November in Korea. Universities base their admissions heavily on the results of this test, so it is very stressful and students spend the majority of their high school days working to get a good score on this test.

Examples:
저는 내년에 수능을 봐야 돼요 = I need to write 수능 next year

원래 대학교에 갈 계획이 있었지만 수능을 잘 못 봐서 대학교에 갈 수 없었어요
= I had plans to go to university, but I couldn’t get in because I did bad on the Korean SAT test

대학교에 가려면 수능을 잘 봐야 돼요
= If you want to be able to go to University, you should do well on 수능

아무리 열심히 공부해도 수능을 못 본다면 대학교에 못 가요
= Regardless of how hard you study, if you don’t do well on 수능, you can’t go to University

참치 = tuna

Common Usages:
참치통조림 = tuna can

Examples:
참치를 잡으러 그 섬에 갈 계획이 있어요
= I have plans to go to that island to catch tuna

참치는 한국 사람들이 흔히 즐겨먹는 생선 중 하나예요
= Tuna is one of the (types of) fish that Korean people commonly enjoy

통조림 = can

Common Usages:
참치통조림 = tuna can
통조림을 따다 = to open a can

Examples:
통조림은 오랫동안 음식을 보관할 수 있어요 = Cans can preserve/store foods for a long time
통조림 음식을 먹을 때는 안에 있는 음식물을 꺼내서 바로 먹는 게 좋아요 = When you eat canned foods, it is best if you take the food in the can out and eat it right away

판사 = a judge

Examples:
그 권리에 대해 얘기하려고 변호사가 판사를 내일 만날 예정이에요
= The lawyer is scheduled to meet the judge tomorrow to talk about that right

판사가 되는 것은 변호사가 되는 것보다 더 힘들고 어려워요
= It is more difficult to become a judge than becoming a lawyer

판사가 판결을 할 때는 사건 전체를 보고 결정해야 돼요
= When judges make their judgment, they need to look at the whole case and then decide

변호사 = a lawyer

Examples:
5년 동안 노력해서 변호사가 될 가치가 있었어요
= It was worth it for me to work hard for five years and become a lawyer

그 권리에 대해 얘기하려고 변호사가 판사를 내일 만날 예정이에요
= The lawyer is scheduled to meet the judge tomorrow to talk about that right

판사가 되는 것은 변호사가 되는 것보다 더 힘들고 어려워요
= It is more difficult to become a judge than becoming a lawyer

권리 = a right

The pronunciation of this word is closer to “궐리”

Common Usages:
권리를 주장하다 = to stand/fight for a right

Examples:
그 권리에 대해 얘기하려고 변호사가 판사를 내일 만날 예정이에요
= The lawyer is scheduled to meet the judge tomorrow to talk about that right

소비자는 사서 먹는 모든 음식에 대한 영양소를 알 권리가 있어요
= Consumers have the right to know all of the nutrition (facts) about the foods they buy

채식주의자 = vegetarian

The pronunciation of this word is closer to “채식쭈의자”

Examples:
네가 채식주의자인 줄 몰랐어 = I didn’t know that you are a vegetarian
건강 문제가 일어나지 않게 채식주의자들은 여러 가지 야채를 골고루 먹어야 돼요 = In order to prevent health problems from coming up, vegetarians need to eat various different types of vegetables

증상 = symptom

Common Usages:
초기 증상 = symptoms at the beginning (of doing/receiving something)
중기 증상 = symptoms in the middle (of doing/receiving something)
말기 증상 = symptoms at the end (of doing/receiving something)

Examples:
증상이 계속 나타나면 병원에 올 준비를 하세요 = Get ready to come to the hospital if symptoms persist
기침을 심하게 하고 가래가 나오는 것은 폐암의 초기 증상이에요= Severely coughing and phlegm coming out is one of the initial symptoms of lung cancer

= island

Examples:
이 섬은 육지에서 멀리 떨어진 고립된 섬이에요 = This island is an island isolated far from land
참치를 잡으러 그 섬에 갈 계획이 있어요 = I have plans to go to that island to catch tuna
저는 영화 ‘비치’의 촬영지였던 피피섬에 꼭 가고 싶어요 = I definitely want to go to Phi Phi Island, the filming location of the movie “The Beach”

규모 = scale, size

Common Usages:
소규모 = small scale
대규모 = large scale

Examples:
우리 사업규모를 내년에 늘릴 계획이 있어요
= We have plans to increase the scale of our business next year

우리는 소규모 장소에서 시작할 준비가 됐어요
= We are ready to start in a small (scale) location

제품을 대규모로 안 팔아서 이 일을 그만둘 계획이 있어요
= They don’t sell their products on a large scale, so I am planning to quit this job

우리는 아직 대규모 공장에서 할 준비가 안 되었어요
= We aren’t ready to do it in a large (scale) factory yet

이 행사에는 전 세계의 대통령이 참석하기 때문에 규모가 굉장히 커요
= The scale of this event is incredibly big because presidents from the whole world will attend

소규모 = small scale

Examples:
이 동아리는 소규모 동아리입니다 = This club is a small-scale club
우리는 소규모 장소에서 시작할 준비가 됐어요 = We are ready to start in a small (scale) location

대규모 = large scale

Examples:
제품을 대규모로 안 팔아서 이 일을 그만둘 계획이 있어요
= They don’t sell their products on a large scale, so I am planning to quit this job

우리는 아직 대규모 공장에서 할 준비가 안 되었어요
= We aren’t ready to do it in a large (scale) factory yet

오늘 대규모 대회가 이곳에서 진행될 예정이니 차를 가지고 오지 말아 주세요
= Today a large scale competition is scheduled to be held here, so please don’t bring your cars

눈앞 = in-front of one's eyes

The pronunciation of this word is closer to “누납”

Common Usages:
눈앞에서 사라지다 = to disappear in-front of one’s eyes
눈앞이 캄캄하다 = to not know what to do because “everything looks dark”

Examples:
그런 불쌍한 애기들을 눈앞에 아직 볼 준비가 안 됐어요
= I’m not ready to see those pitiful/sad babies in-front of my eyes yet

제 미래를 생각할 때마다 미래가 너무 불투명해 눈앞이 캄캄해져요
= Whenever I think about my future, my future is not clear so I don’t know what to do

눈앞에 놓인 이익만 보고 행동을 하면 더 큰 이익을 놓칠 수도 있어요
= If I only look at the profit right in-front of my eyes, I might miss a bigger profit

Verbs:
굽다 = to roast, grill

The pronunciation of this word is closer to “굽따”

Examples:
저는 음식을 쪄서 먹는 것보다 구워서 먹는 걸 더 좋아해요
= Instead of steaming food, I prefer roasting it

공원에 가서 삼겹살을 다 같이 구울 계획이 있어요
= We are planning to all go to the park and grilling 삼겹살 together

아침에 빵집을 지나가면 빵 굽는 냄새로 기분이 좋아져요
= When I walk by a bakery in the morning, the smell of “roasting” bread makes me happy

굽히다 = to bend one's body

The pronunciation of this word is closer to “구피다”

Common Usages:
몸을 굽히다 = to bend over
무릎을 굽히다 = to bend one’s knees
허리를 굽히다 = to bend over (at the waist)

Examples:
몸을 굽힐 준비를 하세요 = Get ready to bend your body

몸을 뒤로 굽히고 스트레칭을 할 준비가 되었어요?
= Are you ready to bend (your body) backwards and stretch?

운동을 할 때 무릎을 살짝 굽히고 운동을 하면 부상을 예방할 수 있어요
= When you exercise, if you bend your knees a little bit, you can prevent injury

구부리다 = to bend an object

Common Usages:
허리를 구부리다 = t bend over (at the waist)

Examples:
옷걸이가 완전히 구부러져 있어요 = The clothes hanger is completely bent
구부러져 있는 길에서 아직 운전할 준비가 안 됐어요 = I’m not ready to drive on a curved street yet
허리를 구부릴 때마다 통증이 있어서 병원에 가 봐야 해요 = Whenever I bend over, there is pain, so I need to go to the hospital

방어하다 = to defend

The noun form of this word (“방어”) translates to “defense.”

Common Usages:
자기방어를 하다 = to protect oneself/self defense

Examples:
우리 나라를 방어할 준비가 됐습니까? = Are you ready to defend our country?
그는 가끔씩 자기방어로 거짓말을 해요 = He lies sometimes to defend himself
그 선수가 공격을 하자 상대방 선수가 그 공격을 방어하기 위해 재빨리 움직였어요 = As soon as that player attacked, his adversary moved swiftly to defend the attack

그만두다 = to quit a job or task

Common Usages:
일을 그만두다 = to quit a job
학교를 그만두다 = to quit school

Examples:
나는 개인적 문제로 회사를 그만두었다 = I quit the company due to personal problems
그 선생님은 지금 그만두거나 퇴직을 할 수 있어요 = That teacher can quit now or retire
부장님이 저를 매일 혼내서 저는 일을 어쩔 수 없이 그만두었어요  = Because the boss would get mad at me every day, I had no choice but to quit

벗기다 = to undress somebody, to peel a fruit/vegetable

The pronunciation of this word is closer to “벋끼다”

Common Usages:
옷을 벗기다 = to take clothes off of another person
껍질을 벗기다 = to peel a fruit/vegetable

Examples:
양말을 벗겨 주세요 = Please take off my socks
참외껍질을 벗길 준비가 됐어요? = Are you ready to cut the skin off of the oriental melon?
양파껍질을 다 벗겨 주세요 = Please take the peel off of the onion
키위를 먹으면 껍질을 안 벗겨도 맛있어요 = Even if you don’t peel the skin off of a kiwi when you eat it, it is delicious

Passive Verbs:
굽다 = to be curved/bent

굽다 does not follow the ㅂ irregular
The pronunciation of this word is closer to “굽따”

Common Usages:
등이 굽다 = for one’s back to be bent

Examples:
어렸을 때부터 자세가 바르지 않으면 등이 굽을 수도 있어요
= If your posture isn’t right from a young age, your back can be bent

Adjectives:
불쌍하다 = to be pitiful

Examples:
그런 불쌍한 애기들을 눈앞에 아직 볼 준비가 안 됐어요
= I’m not ready to see those pitiful/sad babies in-front of my eyes yet

길가에서 아이와 함께 구걸하는 사람들이 너무 불쌍해요
= People with children begging on the streets are very pitiful

For help memorizing these words, try using our Memrise tool.

 

Introduction

In the first few lessons of Unit 2, you learned how you can use ~는 것 to describe a noun with a verb. Though we haven’t specifically talked about ~는 것 in the past few lessons, there are still a few more related concepts that you should know. In this lesson, you will learn three nouns (예정, 계획 and 준비) that are often described by a preceding verb/clause. Let’s get started.

 

To be scheduled to… :~/예정

You should remember the function of adding ~는 것to verb stems from previous lessons. If you forget the purpose of ~는 것, I highly suggest that you review Lesson 26 and the lessons that follow. To review briefly, adding ~는 것 to a verb stem turns the verb into a word that can describe an upcoming noun.

This can be done using ~ㄴ/은 것 to describe the noun in the past tense:
제가 먹은 것 = The thing I ate

Or using ~는 것 to describe the noun in the present tense:
제가 먹는 것 = The thing I eat

Or using ~ㄹ/을 것 to describe the noun in the future tense:
제가 먹을 것 = The thing I will eat

Other nouns can be used instead of “것” in these types of sentences. For example:
제가 먹는 음식 = The food I eat

A common noun that is often described by the ~는 것 principle is “예정” (meaning “schedule”). For example:

제가 할 예정
제가 먹을 예정
Notice that 예정 is being described using the future tense ~ㄹ/을

You should know that “제가 할 예정” and “제가 먹을 예정” are not complete sentences, as they do not have a predicating verb or adjective at the end of the sentence. In order to do this, we should add 이다 to 예정. For example:

제가 할 예정이에요
제가 먹을 예정이에요

By doing this, you create the meaning of “One is scheduled to…” The sentences above would translate to:

제가 할 예정이에요 = I am scheduled to do it
제가 먹을 예정이에요 = I am scheduled to eat

The two sentences above were used to present the grammar structure of these types of sentences. However, they are a little unnatural simply because there isn’t really any context or other information that indicates what is “scheduled.” The examples below are more natural sounding sentences using this grammatical structure:

우리는 10시에 만날 예정이에요 = We are scheduled to meet at 10:00
수업이 4시쯤에 시작될 예정이에요 = The class is scheduled to start at about 4:00pm
학생들이 수능을 다음 달에 볼 예정이에요 = The students are scheduled to write 수능 next month

비행기가 9시에 출발할 예정이지만 눈이 많이 와서 못 출발할 것 같아요
= The plane is scheduled to depart at 9:00, but it probably won’t because it is snowing a lot

그 권리에 대해 얘기하려고 변호사가 판사를 내일 만날 예정이에요
= The lawyer is scheduled to meet the judge tomorrow to talk about that right

 

 

To have plans to…: ~/계획

By using a similar composition that was described in the previous section (~ㄹ/을 예정이다), you can create the meaning of “I have plans to…” or “I am planning to…” By replacing “것” with “계획” in the future tense conjugation of ~는 것, you can create the following meanings::

먹을 계획 = plans to eat
공부할 계획 = plans to study
갈 계획 = plans to go

In English as well as in Korean, we say “I have plans to…” Therefore, in order to finish these sentences, we should add “있다” to them. For example:

먹을 계획이 있다 = to have plans to eat
공부할 계획이 있다 = to have plans to study
갈 계획이 있다 = to have plans to go

This form can then be used in more complex sentences:

참치를 잡으러 그 섬에 갈 계획이 있어요 = I have plans to go to that island to catch tuna

제품을 대규모로 안 팔아서 이 일을 그만둘 계획이 있어요
= They don’t sell their products on a large scale, so I am planning to quit this job

우리 사업규모를 내년에 늘릴 계획이 있어요
= We have plans to increase the scale of our business next year

공원에 가서 삼겹살을 다 같이 구울 계획이 있어요
= We are planning to all go to the park and grilling 삼겹살 together

제가 친구를 만날 계획이 있었지만 친구는 안 왔어요
= I had plans to meet my friend, but he didn’t come

원래 대학교에 갈 계획이 있었지만 수능을 잘 못 봐서 대학교에 갈 수 없었어요
= I had plans to go to university, but I couldn’t get in because I did bad on the SAT test

 

 

 

To be ready… ㄹ/을 준비

Another noun that is commonly placed after the future ~는 것 conjugation is “준비” (preparation, readiness, or the noun form of “to prepare”). The most common ways you will see 준비 used like this are described below.

 

To be ready to…: ~/ 준비( 됐다

In the previous lesson, you learned that one meaning of the word “되다” is to indicate that something is “going well” or “working well.” For example:

일이 잘 돼요? = Is your work going well?
여기서 Wi-Fi가 잘 돼요 = The Wi-Fi here works well

By describing “준비” with a preceding clause, you can refer to the preparation of that clause. For example:

갈 준비 = the preparation of going
먹을 준비 = the preparation of eating
공부할 준비 = the preparation of studying

By using the word “되다” in these sentences, one can indicate whether this preparation is “going well” or not. For example:

갈 준비가 됐다 = the preparation of going went well
먹을 준비가 됐다 = the preparation of eating went well
공부할 준비가 됐다 = the preparation of studying went well

I like the English translations above because they show how ~ㄹ/을 준비가 되다 takes on this particular meaning. However, the most common translation for these types of sentences is “one is ready to.” For example:

갈 준비가 됐다 = to be ready to go
먹을 준비가 됐다 = to be ready to eat
공부할 준비가 됐다 = to be ready to study

Notice that 되다 is conjugated to the past tense to indicate that the “preparation went well” which would also indicate that one “is ready.”

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In theory you could see 준비가 되다 presented as the passive verb 준비되다, which would mean “to be prepared.” The sentences above could be written/spoken as:

갈 준비됐다 = to be ready to go
먹을 준비됐다 = to be ready to eat
공부할 준비됐다 = to be ready to study

I tend to think that this use of “~ㄹ/을 준비되다” is incorrect because ~ㄹ/을 is not describing a noun and instead describing a verb which in theory it cannot do. However, in speech (especially because the use of ~가 on 준비 can be omitted) these two different forms cannot be distinguished from another. Therefore, it is common to also see this form.

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We can see this construction used in more complicated sentences. For example:

저는 지금 갈 준비가 됐어요 = I am ready to go now
저는 아무 때나 일을 시작할 준비가 됐어요 = I am ready to start working any time
그 병의 증상을 설명할 준비가 되었어요 = I am ready to explain the symptoms of that disease
우리는 소규모 장소에서 시작할 준비가 됐어요 = We are ready to start in a small (scale) location

You can indicate that one is not ready by adding a negative conjugation. For example:

저는 아직 결혼할 준비가 되지 않았어요 = I’m still not ready to get married
저는 5분 후에 갈 예정이었지만 아직 갈 준비가 안 됐다 = I was scheduled to go in 5 minutes, but I’m not ready yet
우리는 아직 대규모 공장에서 할 준비가 안 되었어요 = We aren’t ready to do it in a large (scale) factory yet
구부러져 있는 길에서 아직 운전할 준비가 안 됐어요 = I’m not ready to drive on a curved street yet
그런 불쌍한 애기들을 눈앞에 아직 볼 준비가 안 됐어요 = I’m not ready to see those pitiful/sad babies in-front of my eyes yet

These types of sentences are commonly used in the form of a question to ask if somebody is (or is not) ready. For example:

파티에 갈 준비가 됐어요? = Are you ready to go yet?
비행기가 아직 출발할 준비가 안 됐습니까? = Is the plane not yet ready to go?
참외껍질을 벗길 준비가 됐어요? = Are you ready to cut the skin off of the melon?
우리 나라를 방어할 준비가 됐습니까? = Are you ready to defend our country?
1년 동안 채식주의자가 될 준비가 되었어요? = Are you ready to be a vegetarian for a year?
몸을 뒤로 굽히고 스트레칭을 할 준비가 되었어요? = Are you ready to bend (your body) backwards and stretch?

 

 

Using the imperative voice to tell somebody to get ready: ~/ 준비() 하세요
In Lesson 40 you learned how to make commands using the imperative voice. For example:

빨리 올라와 = Come up quick
빨리 올라와요 = Come up quick
빨리 올라오셔요 = Come up quick

You can attach any of these imperative endings to 준비하다 to make a command telling somebody to “get ready.” For example:

밥을 준비하세요! = Get the food ready/prepare the food!
모든 것을 준비하세요! = Get everything ready/prepare everything

In order to tell somebody to get ready to do something, you should use the ~는 것 principle. To do this, you can describe the noun “준비” with a preceding clause connected to the future ~ㄹ/을 addition. For example:

갈 준비 = the preparation of “going”
먹을 준비 = the preparation of “eating”
공부할 준비 = the preparation of “studying”

After this, the object particle ~를 can be attached to 준비 and 하다 can be used with an imperative conjugation to tell somebody to “do that” preparation. The common translation of this in English is “get ready to….” For example:

갈 준비를 하세요 = Get ready to go!
먹을 준비를 하세요 = Get ready to eat!
공부할 준비를 하세요 = Get ready to study

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Just like with the sentences earlier with 준비가 되다, you can also see the sentences above presented as

갈 준비하세요 = Get ready to go!
먹을 준비하세요 = Get ready to eat!
공부할 준비하세요 = Get ready to study

I tend to think that this use of “~ㄹ/을 준비하다” is incorrect because ~ㄹ/을 is not describing a noun and instead describing a verb which in theory it cannot do. However, in speech (especially because the use of ~를 on 준비 can be omitted) these two different forms cannot be distinguished from another. Therefore, it is common to also see this form.

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Below are more examples:

몸을 굽힐 준비를 하세요 = Get ready to bend your body
수능을 볼 준비를 하세요 = Get ready to write the 수능 test
일을 곧 그만둘 준비를 하세요 = Get ready to quit your job soon
증상이 계속 나타나면 병원에 올 준비를 하세요 = Get ready to come to the hospital if symptoms persist

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I have had a few readers contact me to ask why the particle ~를 is used in the sentences above but ~가 is used in the sentences introduced earlier in the lessons (for example, in “저는 지금 갈 준비 됐어요”). I feel like this is almost too obvious to talk about, but more than one person has asked me, so I want to provide an answer in case other learners have the same problem.

The use of ~를 or ~가 in these cases is due to the nature of the verb that predicates the sentence. In the sentences above, ~를 is used because 하다 is an active verb and can act on objects with ~를/을. However, 되다 is a passive verb and cannot act on objects – and thus a sentence predicated by 되다 cannot have an object with ~를/을 attached. It is the same reason why the following sentences use ~를/을 and ~이/가 respectively:

밥을 준비했어요 = I prepared rice
밥이 준비되었어요 = The rice was prepared

If you are unsure about passive verbs, I suggest that you read Lesson 14.

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That’s it for Unit 2! If you feel comfortable with everything you learned in Unit 2, why not try moving on to Unit 3!
Not feeling so comfortable, why don’t you review everything that we covered in Unit 2.

If you are confident in what you learned from Lessons 42 – 50, try taking our Mini-Quiz where you can test your knowledge on everything you learned in Lessons 42 – 50. If you have done that, you can also try taking our Unit 2 Test to test yourself on everything you learned in Unit 2. Or,

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